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AFC - Match Report
match report 1922-23 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
14/10/1922
 
Aberdeen 0 - 0 Rangers
Kick Off:           
Attendance: 27,000
Venue: Pittodrie Stadium, Aberdeen
SPECTATORS THRILLED. MAKESHIFT TEAM DOES WELL AT PITTODRIE
Aberdeen and Rangers divided the points in a great game at Pittodrie, where a record crowd of about 27,000 witnessed many thrilling incidents but no scoring - a result similar to the corresponding match last season. Rangers showed superior combination in the first half, but were met with a stalwart defence, in which the backs, Hutton and Forsyth, with Blackwell, the goalkeeper, were prominent, Hutton especially with his powerful and sure kicking being outstanding, receiving many a cheer when he stopped attacks. Archibald and Cunningham, on the Rangers right wing, were the most dangerous of the forwards, but their crosses generally were not so smartly taken by Henderson and Cairns as they ought to have been, for Hutton and Forsyth were ever on the alert. Smith, the ex-Rangers player on the Aberdeen left wing, was the most brilliant forward on the field, and he evidently delighted to harass his former comrades. Moir, the young Muggiemoss player, was tried at centre-forward for Aberdeen, but though he made a good show evidently found himself outclassed in facing such a team as the Rangers, and his shooting was inaccurate. The drawings at the gates and from the stands amounted to over 1500. A number of motor charabancs conveying brake club members arrived in Aberdeen in the forenoon, having travelled from Glasgow during the night.

Source: The Scotsman, 16th October 1922

 
There was a record attendance at Pittodrie, where Aberdeen and Rangers fought a goalless draw. The game was punctuated by many thrilling incidents, and if Aberdeen came near to scoring, it could be said the result did justice to both teams.
Aberdeen had to make a last-minute re-arrangement consequent upon the indisposition of A. R. Grosert. His place at right-half was taken by Grant, who had originally been selected for inside left. The latter position was assigned to Rankine, and the task of leading the attack was entrusted to Moir. Rangers were without Dixon and Morton, their side being identical to that which defeated Hibernian a week before.

Thrilling Moments.

It was a stern struggle throughout between two well-matched teams, both adopted spoiling tactics, and with every man marked by an opponent it was not surprising that forward moves were not allowed to develop to any great extent. From the contest the respective defences emerged with considerable credit. Both sets were resolute and determined in all they did, and against resourceful opponents their work was such as to compel admiration. While the result was satisfactory to all concerned, Aberdeen came nearer to winning. On one occasion a headed ball from Thomson landed on the top of Robb's crossbar, and another time a terrific shot by Grant struck the Rangers' goalpost when the keeper was helpless to save. The escapes were not confined to one end, as Henderson, the Rangers centre-forward, on one occasion was left with a clear field for goal, but instead of shooting or going right ahead he cut out to the right, and ere he crossed the ball the Aberdeen defence had recovered, and one the best ?if not the best ?scoring opportunities of the game was lost. Neither set of forwards got much chance to combine or to shoot, so accurate was the tackling of the opposing half-backs, but the attackers did not shine as marksmen on the very few opportunities they got. Grant, the home right-half, supplied an exception, as, shortly after the start, he drove in a terrific shot with his left foot, Robb being fortunate be in line to knock the ball down and clear. From start to finish of a gruelling encounter, there was not a player on either side who spared himself. The play was always vigorous but never rough, and such stoppages for injuries as occurred were the outcome of accident, and incidental to the pace and excitement of the game. There were very few fouls that could be classified as "intentional, " and it was one of the cleanest contested and most sporting tussles seen on the ground.

Defence Outshines Attack.

On the Aberdeen side, Blackwell had not great deal do, but got through work well. One of the thrilling moments of the game was shortly after the start, when he rushed out his goal to punch away from Archibald as Henderson rushed in. The got his fist on the ball, but collided with the Ranger, and required attention. Another particularly fine save was when he tipped a high hall from Archibald over the bar. He was fortunate on one occasion when he left his goal, and along with others missed a ball from Archibald, but apart, from that he acquitted himself splendidly. Hutton and Forsyth were brilliant at back. The first-named struck his best form of the season, and although he was injured in a collision with Lawson in the first period, he recovered, and his play not the least impaired. Forsyth had the Rangers' better wing to contend with, but showed great resource, and in the second half was master of Archibald. All three half-backs played a spoiling game that suited the occasion. As in the case of the Rangers trio, they found little time to back up their forwards, but none of the three would admit of defeat. Grant, in an unaccustomed role, performed very creditably, and his shooting suggested he would have strengthened the forward line had he been included in it; as it was, those who selected the team need not regret their judgment in placing him in the middle line.
The best of the forward moves on the home side came from Rankine and Smith, who showed great cleverness as the left wing, and in conjunction with MacLachlan executed some pretty triangular moves. Moir showed much dash at centre-forward, and if he was not at all skilful, and was distinctly unfortunate in shooting, he was always a menace to the Rangers' defence. Thomson executed some clever moves without revealing his best form, but worked tremendously hard in defence and attack, and Middleton was rather overshadowed by McCandless.

,b>Rangers Stalwarts.

Neither team could claim superiority in any department over the other. Robb was clever goalkeeper, and Manderson and McCandless two capital backs, especially the latter, whose coolness and resource when harassed by rushing opponents were admirable. The half-backs were spoilers just like those of Aberdeen. In the play of Muirhead, however, there was much that took the eye from the constructive point of view. Archibald was the best and most dangerous of the Rangers forwards such time as he got support from Cunningham, but when the latter fell away in the second half the winger's play suffered, and Forsyth rather got the better of him. Henderson was ever a trier, but was none too dangerous, and the best of the inside trio was Cairns, who revealed much clever footwork. Lawson was a fair success on the left wing, but was greatly handicapped in the second half by an injury sustained in the first period.

Model Spectators. In what was a most exciting contest the spectators conducted themselves in a most sportsmanlike manner, and although an Aberdeen victory would have greatly pleased the majority, there was no discordant note. The spontaneous applause which followed anything particularly clever accomplished by any of the players, whether home or visiting, showed that partisanship did not distort their conception of fair play, and at the finish all were cordial in their appreciation of the wholehearted efforts of all the players concerned to attain victory.

Source: Aberdeen Daily Journal 16th October 1922

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Blackwell, Hutton, Forsyth, Grant, Milne, MacLachlan, Middleton, Thomson, Moir, Rankin, Smith.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Rangers Teamsheet:  Robb; Manderson, McCandless; Johnstone, Meiklejohn, Muirhead; Archibald, Cunningham, Henderson. Cairns, Lawson

Bookings:

Referee: J. Binnie, Falkirk

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