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AFC - Match Report
match report 1927-28 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
11/02/1928
 
Falkirk 5 - 1 Aberdeen
Kick Off:    Houston 4, Morrison, Houston, Houston, Morrison       Yorston.  
Attendance: 6,000
Venue: Brockville Park, Falkirk
ABERDEEN FALL HEAVILY AT FALKIRK. Costly First-Half Lapses.
Aberdeen found Falkirk in a vengeful mood at Brockville Park, Falkirk. The heavy defeat they sustained at Tynecastle on Wednesday required some atonement, and that was made to the extent of a five goals to one victory. All Falkirk's goals were scored in the first half, during which period the team played brilliantly, moving sweetly and swiftly in combination and finishing with deadly effect. The game had not been more than two minutes in progress when Houston turned to account a fine bit of work by Cox, and very soon afterwards Morrison scored a second goal, also from a pass by the right winger. Aberdeen tried hard to force the play into home territory, but Smith was the only forward who gave Ferguson any trouble. Falkirk were in an irresistible mood, and their good play brought two more goals from Houston, who thus completed his "hat trick," and another from Morrison just before the interval. Crossing over with a lead of five goals, Falkirk had the game well won, but Aberdeen were not inclined to let matters go at that. In the second half they gave a wonderfully improved display, and for the most part they had Falkirk not only defending but defending desperately. The forwards, however, were not particularly effective at goal, and several good chances were missed, though Ferguson had more than one brilliant save to his credit. The reward of persistent and plucky effort came fifteen minutes from the finish, when Yorston scored with a fairly soft shot that Ferguson allowed to slip beneath his body as he lay on the ground. The visitors fought bravely in the hope of further success, but that was denied them.

Source: The Scotsman, 13th February 1928

 
In three matches, at Firhill, Ibrox, and Brockville respectively, the Dons have lost 17 goals. They were beaten by five goals to one at Falkirk on Saturday. In this game the whole team played badly. There was a lack of harmony. The defence made serious blunders, while the forwards, the inside men especially, finished very weakly. The main difference between the teams was that Falkirk controlled the ball better and moved in a more methodical manner. "Patsy" Gallacher was the schemer, and Morrison and Houston the sharpshooters, while the last-names player was brilliant in outfield play as well. The Bairns laid bare the weakness in the Aberdeen team.

It was a peculiar game at Brockville on Saturday. Aberdeen were heavily beaten, yet taking the game all through, they had, territorially, a greater share of the play. Notwithstanding this, the play of the Aberdeen team was rank bad. In the first half especially, the defence was at seas, and the attack was more or less hopelessly out of it. Falkirk, in the other hand, were quick to seize their chances. Houston, a player who was regarded as a "wash-out" by many at Falkirk when he first joined the Brockville staff, performed the "hat-trick," and I have no hesitation in saying that he was the best forward on the field. Morrison, a centre-forward whom Aberdeen had an eye on before he left Stenhousemuir, scored the Bairns' other two goals, and it was not Gallacher's fault, at any rate, that Morrison did not emulate Houston's feat of finding the net on three occasions. Still, thanks to a recovery on the part of the Aberdeen defence in the second half, "Evelyn" was so ardently wooed by a host of suitors that he was given very little scope. McHale appeared to have been much enamoured, for he was most assiduous in his attentions to "Evelyn" after tea-time. Aberdeen's goal, their only crumb of comfort, was got by Yorston, but I do think Ferguson could have prevented the ball from entering the net had he exercised a little more care.

A Bad Policy

It seemed to me that in the early stages of the game, Aberdeen's policy was to concentrate their attention on the wily Gallacher. I certainly agree that "Patsy" requires a lot of watching, but in the opening minutes almost the whole Aberdeen team were on Gallacher's "top." But the old Celt had the situation well summed-up. When he got the ball, he was more or less surrounded by Aberdeen players, but by means of his famous body swerve he completely deceived his opponents, and instead of Morrison getting the ball, it went out to Cox on the extreme right. The latter swung it over to Houston, who had only Blackwell in front of him, and the rest was easy. The way in which this goal came about proved how easy it is to completely wander a defence. I do contend, however, that the Aberdeen defenders should have been able to offer Blackwell greater protection on this occasion. Houston's other two goals were also very cleverly taken, but the best goal of the match was Morrison's first one, when he cut in from the right and met a cross from the left with his head, Blackwell being beaten to the world.

Poor Inside Men

So much for the goals. Aberdeen were well and truly beaten. Their policy throughout was brainless, but I will say that if Cheyne had been in his place, and with Hector Lawson, or McLeod at inside left, there would have been a big improvement in attack. Cosgrove and McDermid were poor inside men. I have never seen such feeble attempts at passing a ball as were made by these two players. As for shooting - well, they were never on the mark, and did not always shoot when they had the opportunity. I say emphatically that with two such players as his henchmen, it was useless for Yorston to expect much support. The ex-Richmond player was in the mood n Saturday, but he got very dew opportunities, while he was well watched by McIlwaine. Love and Smith would have done better had they received better backing.

Improvement at Back Needed

The half-backs were by no means at their best. Black was good after the interval, and he tried to show his forwards how to shoot. McHale was only a defender, but failed to support his forwards; while Ross found Gallacher too great a problem. It seemed to me that in this game Jackson and Livingstone did not have the understanding necessary in the back division. On one occasion in particular in the second half they entered into what appeared to be a heated argument. What was the cause of the argument, I cannot say, but personally I do not like to see this sort of thing on the field of play. It creates a bad impression. One thing is certain, however, the back division requires strengthening for next season, and it was gratifying to know that young Cooper is making splendid progress and coming up to expectations.
Blackwell was by no means faultless, yet he effected many clever saves.

Source: Bon-Accord, 18th February, 1928

 
The Aberdeen defence was badly riddled at Brockville, when Falkirk triumphed by five goals to one. All the winners' goals were scored in a remarkable first half, when Aberdeen attacked as frequently as Falkirk, but with the Pittodrie defence easily scattered, the home team found goal-getting not at all difficult. In the second half, Aberdeen again had their fair share of the attacking, but had to console themselves with ono goal.
The sun shone strongly throughout the game, but after heavy rain the pitch was in a muddy and sodden state. There were about 6000 spectators.

AN EARLY REVERSE.

Falkirk took the lead in four minutes, when Cox broke away and centred for Houston, who was unmarked, to head past Blackwell. Subsequently Aberdeen got going, and after a shot by McDermid had been blocked, Black was just wide with fierce drive. Following a raid by the home left, the Aberdeen goal had a narrow escape, Gallagher failing to take a cross from Gall, with Blackwell out of his charge. Livingstone headed out below the Aberdeen crossbar, and subsequently Morrison obtained a second goal for Falkirk after accepting a pass close in from Cox. Aberdeen frequently attacked after this, but failed to make any impression on the solid defence of Scobie, Gilroy, and Ferguson, although several corner kicks were conceded. Houston ran through to score a third goal for Falkirk, Blackwell making a fine effort, but just failing to hold the shot. Subsequently Aberdeen enjoyed a spell of attacking, and centre by Smith went abegging. A clever piece of dribbling by Gallagher led to Houston netting a fourth goal from close in, and towards the interval Morrison met a cross by Gall, to head through a fifth for Falkirk, who were flattered their big lead.

ONE FOR ABERDEEN.

Aberdeen were seen to better advantage in the second period, when their defence stiffened up, but the forwards were still weak in front of goal. Black brought Ferguson to full length in the first minute, and at the other end Blackwell effected a fine save from Morrison. For a time Falkirk pushed home the attack, and Blackwell was frequently in action, but the home forwards were not as dangerous as they had been the first half. Smith for Aberdeen had a chance, but passed when he might have shot. After twenty minutes' play Yorston got through to beat Ferguson from close in with a ground shot. Following this success Aberdeen made fierce onslaughts on the defence, and a number of shots were blocked in the home penalty area, but Ferguson had little of a dangerous nature to deal with, a shot by Smith being an exception.<.br> In midfield the Aberdeen forwards were the equals of the home attackers, but near goal they were lacking in punch, and there was an absence of co-operation in defence, particularly at full back.

Source: Aberdeen Daily Journal, 13th February 1928

Falkirk Teamsheet:  Ferguson; Scott, Gilroy; Cowle, McIlwaine, Ritchie; Cox, Gallagher, Morrison, Houston, Gall

Bookings:

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Blackwell, Jackson, Livingstone, Black, McHale, Ross, Love, Cosgrove, Yorston, McDermid, Smith.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Referee: M. Quinn, Bellshill

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