Click here to go back to the AFC Heritage Trust Homepage Aberdeen Football Club Heritage Trust Logo  
AFC - Match Report
match report 1908-09 fixture list
Div 1 (Old) 
30/01/1909
 
Aberdeen 6 - 1 Third Lanark
    Blackburn's Day.
Kick Off:    Blackburn, O'Hagan, Blackburn, Murray, Lennie, O'Hagan.       Kidd  
Attendance: 5,500
Venue: Pittodrie Stadium, Aberdeen
At Aberdeen on a hard pitch, which had been liberally covered with sand. Aberdeen won the toss, and being the lighter tam, kept their feet better than their weightier opponents. The first half was entirely in favour of the home side who scored through Blackburn twice and O'Hagan, thus crossing with a lead of three goals. The Third went better in the second half, but Aberdeen scored again through Murray. Then Richardson scored for the visitors, and Lennie and Niblo added to Aberdeen's total. Result :- Aberdeen, six; Third Lanark, one.

Source: The Scotsman, 1st February 1909

 
On a frostbound pitch, and in cold, wintry weather, Aberdeen and Third Lanark played off their Scottish League fixture at Pittodrie Park on Saturday. Previous to the hour of starting, and number of men were employed and scattering a large quantity of sand over the pitch, but nevertheless the ground was all against good play, owing to the slipper a nature of the surface. The teams lined up at 2:45 as follows:-

Aberdeen: Mutch; Colman, Hume; Davidson, Wilson, Low; Blackburn, H. Murray, Niblo, O'Hagan, Lennie.
Third Lanark: Brownlie; Sloan, Hill; Fairfoull, Ferguson, Dickson; Johnstone, Hosie, Richardson, Kidd, Cross.
Referee - Mr. Matthew, Greenock.

Colman won the toss for Aberdeen, who played towards the pavilion end, with a breeze in their favour. With the ground in a very dangerous state, and keeping in view their meeting in the Scottish Cup competition at Cathkin Park next Saturday, both teams declined to run any risks at the start of the game. Play on the whole was uninteresting during the opening 15 minutes. The players - particularly the third lanark men - had not only great to difficulty in keeping their feet, but the wind proved somewhat troublesome on the fast ground. The ball repeatedly bounded over the players' heads and into touch, while at other times the leather rolled harmlessly out of play when the Third Lanark backs could have returned it down the field. Niblo had a nice opening at the start of the game, but shot over the bar, while Lennie put the ball behind after a smart run a few minutes later. A corner to Aberdeen was sent past by Lennie, who, later on, lost a comparatively easy chance of scoring by shooting high over the bar. Aberdeen had most of the play, the visitors being unable to make any headway against the wind. Cross, on the left wing, occasionally lead the way towards the Aberdeen goal, but Colman and Hume were seldom in difficulties. The Aberdeen right back time and again topped the ball in front of Brownlie, who had to be particularly active in clearing his lines on two occasions. The goalkeeper was almost beaten when he misjudged and drooping shot from Colman, but Brownlie, luckily for his side, just managed to save his charge but tipping the ball round the outside of the post when a goal appeared almost certain for Aberdeen. At this stage Blackburn, was greatly in evidence on the Aberdeen right wing. A cross from the right winger was picked up by Niblo, who shot straight for the net, Brownlie clearing not a moment too soon. An overhead kick by Murray took Brownlie by surprise, the goalkeeper saving cleverly almost under the bar. Gradually Aberdeen assumed the upper hand, and for a time the Third Lanark men were completely outplayed. Blackburn and Murray were specially prominent, but all over the local front rank displayed a wonderful amount of dash and skill on the frozen ground.
Twenty minutes after the start Aberdeen opened the scoring, and it was quite in accordance with the run of the game that the first goal should come from the right wing. Blackburn dashed away on his own, and keeping the ball was thoroughly under control, he completely beat the Third Lanark defence. Cutting in words, Blackburn got in to a good position for scoring, and when he finally beat Brownlie with a hard drive, the crowd showed their appreciation of the right winger's fine play by cheering him again and again. The Cathkin men responded with a brisk attack on the Aberdeen goal, but their pressure was only of short duration. A rousing return by Colman sent Aberdeen straight away to the other end of the field. Niblo, Lennie, and O'Hagan joined in a pretty of movement, which almost brought another goal, the Aberdeen centre forward slipping when quite close to Brownlie. Murray and Blackburn were very troublesome on the right wing, so much so that Hill was very often left standing, being very weak in his tackling. A fine bit of play by Blackburn was followed up with across to the left. O'Hagan rounded the backs and drove hard for goal, Brownlie saving brilliantly on the ground. O'Hagan again had a capital try and landed the ball in the net, but was adjudged offside. The Glasgow Cupholders could make no impression on the Aberdeen defence, Colman and Hume being very reliable, while their kicking was clean and judicious. A fast drive from Lennie was accidental they stopped by Sloan in the goalmouth, the ball striking the right back on the leg when he was crossing over in front of goal to tackle Lennie. Close on half-time Aberdeen Fairlie hemmed in their opponents, Lennie, Niblo, and O'Hagan indulging in a round of clever passing and repassing, which completely baffled the opposing backs. The ball was then crossed to the centre, where Murray just failed to take advantage of an opening. However, he worked his way next minute towards the goal line, and centred squarely in front of goal. O'Hagan snapped up the pass,and, without a moment's hesitation, the inside left banged the ball into the net. A minute before the interval Blackburn scored a third goal, the result of a brilliant shot on the run, following upon clever work on the Aberdeen left wing.

In the second half Aberdeen had to face a strong wind, while a heavy shower of snow also handicapped them to some extent. However, the local players set to work in a thorough business-like fashion. Within 3 minutes after the restart Aberdeen obtained a fourth goal. Murray forced to play along the centre of the field, and subsequently passed out to Blackburn on the wing. The latter tricked the left back, and then made tracks for goal. Instead of shooting, however, he passed to Murray, who promptly shot the ball into the net, Brownlie having no chance. Four goals up, Aberdeen were now in a tolerably safe position, even although baffling against the wind and snow. The Third Lanark now began to take a more serious view of the situation. Cross and Kidd forced the game on the left, and two shots from the first named caused Mutch some on easiness in the Aberdeen goal. The shots sent in, however, lacked sting; indeed, the visitors were very weak in their efforts to score. A weak clearance by Hume was taken advantage of by the Glasgow front rank. The ball came out to Kidd, who steadied himself and then let drive, his shot landing in the corner of the net. This led to an improvement in the play of the "Reds." Colman was prominent for Aberdeen, his kicking being specially good against the wind. Fine work by O'Hagan and Lennie was followed by a brisk attack on Brownlie's goal. Niblo got through between the backs, but lost a couple of chances of scoring, although the centre forward could scarcely be blamed for losing his openings at close quarters owing to the slipper a state of the ground. As the game progressed, Aberdeen's superiority fairly astonished the spectators. The front rank was particularly lively, Blackburn and O'Hagan shining, the right wingers football being quite a feature of the game. A fifth goal came to Aberdeen, Lennie beating Brownlie with a fast drive from a centre by Blackburn. Not to be denied, Aberdeen came away again in irresistible fashion, and when O'Hagan scored the sixth goal of the Glasgow men were thoroughly beaten side.

Aberdeen were easily the better team throughout, and the score does not exaggerate their superiority. The winners' forwards played cleverly, Blackburn and O'Hagan being specially good. About 5000 spectators witnessed the game, the drawings amounting to 112 1s 6d - gate and stands included.

Source: Aberdeen Daily Journal, 1st February 1909

 
The conditions under which the game at Pittodrie was played on Saturday could hardly have been worse. The pitch was hard, and in some parts the ice was quite bare. Sand was spread over the surface to ensure good footing, and on examination the referee declared the ground playable.

It was evident at the start that the players had instructions not to risk too much, for the opening passages lacked vim, and the shooting was erratic, and from long range. The visitors had several promising runs, but their judgment against the wind was bad. Twice the left got away down, and instead of converging towards goal, shooting was tried from the line, and the wind carried the ball behind. Aberdeen's front line were the first to be really dangerous, one of Blackburn's drooping shots causing Brownlie trouble, for his clearance was neither smart nor sure. Lennie got in a shot that ought to have counted, for the ball was in the net sure, but the goalkeeper threw it out, and play was allowed to go on, the referee being of opinion that it was not over the line. The next few minutes brought about a change of play, the Third's defence being pressed hard. A delightful run all on his own brought Blackburn into shooting range, with Hill trying to hustle him off. Getting into position the right winger shot with great force into the corner of the net, leaving Brownlie powerless to save. Once begun, Aberdeen were not content, for a fine bit of play looked like bearing more goals, but offside spoiled the count. O'Hagan made sure shortly afterwards, and popped the ball in from quite a crowd of defenders.
Blackburn added further to his laurels by adding a third point before crossing over.

Refreshed with a cup of Bovril, Aberdeen were as lively as ever on restarting, and the spectators were roused to a high pitch of enthusiasm over Blakburn, who getting a pass well out, raced down the wing, and crossing right in front of goal, Bert Murray put his side four goals up. This further reverse put some more life into the game, and the Thirds came away in a body, but their shooting was again at fault. At length Hosie got in a low one which quite beat Mutch, this being the only good shot they had sent in so far. There was an expressed opinion that the scoring would finish here, but Lennie was not satisfied that all had been done, for, wriggling through the defence, he opened his account; while between them O'Hagan and Niblo put on the sixth goal just on time. The spectatore went home happy, for they had seen a game with plenty of incidents to keep them warm, and had proof that their favourites had returned to form, for they have not been seen to such advantage at home this season. To beat Third Lanark 6-1 in a League match ought to give them confidence for the cup tie on Saturday.

Play and Players.

It did not appear as if the Third forwards, except Hosie, were exerting themselves to the full, and their shooting especially of Cross and Johnstone, was below high standard. The halves were good, but the bulk of the work fell on Sloan, Hill, and Brownlie, who did not spare themselves. On the home side, it was Blackburn's day out, for he was responsible for the majority of the goals and had two off his own feet. It could not be said that any of the others were weaklings, for they all played well and with success too. The halves also accounted for the visiting attack, giving nothing away; while the defence were in tip-top form, making no mistakes. They were worthy winners on the day's play, and we wish them good luck on Saturday, though, of course, the conditions will be different, and the Thirds playing for all they are worth. If they keep their present form, and bar accidents, Aberdeen should win the tie.

,b>Chatty Bits.

Cup ties will hold sway on Saturday, both in England and Scotland.
In England the second round is also due and there are some capital tussles to be witnessed.
The Scottish selectors, it is said, are to be scattered over the ties, looking for talent in both oountries.
It cannot be said that there is great satisfaction in the north over the Selection of the East team to meet the West.
Mutch and Lennie constitute the two representatives from Aberdeen, but the general opinion is that a mistake has been made in passing over Low and Macintosh, whose claims are equal to those selected.
The teams chosen are as follows: West - Brownlie (Third Lanark); McNair (Celtic), and McKenzie (Partick Thistle); Walker (Clyde), Robertson (St Mirren), and R. Anderson (Queen's Park); Bennett (Rangers), McMenemy (Celtic),Quinn (do.), McColl and Paull (Queen's Park).
East - Mutch (Aberdeen); Collins (Hearts), and Chaplin (Dundee); Reid (Falkirk), Hynds (Hearts), and Mair (Dundee); Sinclair (Hearts), Langlands (Dundee), Hunter (do.), Macfarlane (do.), and Lennie (Aberdeen).
We fancy the West to be a much stronger combination than the East, and able to win by a few goals.
There is every indication that a goodly following. will go up to Glasgow with Aberdeen on Saturday.
If Aberdeen survive this round, they should get something spicy for the next, which ought to recoup them for travelling.
The start at Cathkin will be at 3 o'clock, and Mr Philp, Dunfermline, will act as referee.
The progress of the match will be 'phoned direct to Pittodrie, when the "A" Team will be playing Peterhead in the Aberdeenshire ties.

Source: Bon-Accord, 4th February 1909

Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Mutch, Colman, Hume, Davidson, Wilson, Low, Blackburn, Murray, Niblo, O'Hagan, Lennie.

Unused Subs:

Bookings:

Third Lanark Teamsheet:  Brownlie; Sloan, Hill; Fairfoull, Ferguson, Dickson; Johnstone, Hosie, Richardson, Kidd, Cross

Bookings:

Referee: Mr. Matthe, Greenock

Related Links: