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AFC - Match Report
match report 1890-91 fixture list
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08/11/1890
 
Victoria United 1 - 4 The Aberdeen
Kick Off:    Watson       Ritchie, Key, Brown, Key  
Attendance: 0
Venue: Victoria Bridge, Aberdeen
Played at Victoria Bridge Ground amid a heavy downpour of rain, which, however, did not affect the attendance. Both teams were fully represented, and the game was interesting and pleasantly contested. With the wind slightly in their favour in the first 45, the ground men kept play almost constantly in the Aberdeen territory. The pressure was at times very severe, and on several occasions nothing but the worst of luck prevented the Vics, from scoring. Watson had two narrow chances, the ball striking the post in the first attempt, and going behind in the second. Two-thirds of the period had elapsed when Aberdeen got away, and a nice dribble to the goal gave Ritchie a chance, which was taken, and the first point scored. From the kick off the Victoria United pressed, and Watson, rushing the leather up and getting past Ketchen, very cleverly sent in an equalising shot. The players thus crossed over level; but, the Aberdeen, who had now the advantage of the wind, soon put themselves in the lead. Two goals fell to them in less than ten minutes, Key and Brown being the fortunate men. A long spell of give and take play followed. Darkness and the extremely sloppy condition of the ground militated against good work, and the returns therefore do not call for special comment. Some time before the whistle blew Key scored a fourth goal, and as the Vics, were unable to improve their position, they retired defeated by 4 to 1.

Source: Aberdeen Journal, 10th November 1890

 

"ARGUS" ON THE GAME AT TORRY.

The Aberdeen have anew asserted their superiority over the Victoria United, and the United have to add still another to their long list of defeats. That the Victoria United are a most unfortunate team cannot be gainsaid. No matter as to the weather, fair or foul, luck is ever against them. This was again very clearly demonstrated on Saturday. The Whites, on the play shown, were by no means 3 goals the better eleven, and just in proportion as the ground men experienced the hardest of hard lines at the goal mouth, the Aberdeen were phenomenally lucky. The proverbial good luck which rarely, if ever, deserts the Aberdeen when playing at home, proved once more a valuable factor in their play, and had undoubtedly more to do with their victory than any weakness or inferior play of their opponents. To criticise the players severely would be grossly unfair, as good play, or anything approaching to it, was made impossible. It can safely be said that never in Aberdeen has a game of football been played under more wretched or disagreeable atmospheric conditions. Rain and wind successfully combined to put good play out of the question, but they signally failed to damp the ardour or decrease the interest with which the spectators seemed to be imbued; and it speaks volumes for the popularity of the game, and the esteem in which it is held, that so many of the large crowd of onlookers doggedly defied the storm, and remained with praiseworthy tenacity till the referee's whistle sounded and brought relief. The game all over was evenly contested. The Chanonry combination, for the most part, assumed the aggressive, the United acting on the defensive. Whitehead and Brown were the best pair of forwards on the field, their play being characterised by rare dash and speed. With more caution and a better command of the ball, this wing of the Aberdeen ought to show to advantage. Key in centre was good, the goals he shot being fine efforts, but be was too well watched to conspicuously shine. Ritchie, for

A FIRST APPEARANCE,

did well, and is certainly worth his place. Robison was not in it, and never exerted himself. The half-back trio were in good form, Cobban excelling. Ketchen and Wood were not so steady as usual, but doubtless the state of the ground was most to blame for this. Caithness very creditably guarded the uprights. Cannon in goal for the Vics, dodged very cleverly, and used his hands in fine style, but was lamentably deficient in kicking. Simpson played his usual game, and still believes in kicking into touch. With this practice remedied, Peter would prove of inestimable value to his team. Ririe was in champion form, his tackling, kicking, and defensive tactics entitling him to the honour of being classed the best back on the field. Of the halfs, Stewart was the gem, his resolute tackling and sure kicking arousing no little enthusiasm amongst the spectators. Genuine talent is easily recognised, and in this player the United have one of the best half-backs in Aberdeen. Campbell at centre half was much too slow, while his kicking could never be depended on. Ingram is an improvement on Kirkland. In the forward line, Watson in the centre wrought hard, and though rather slow at times, when once he got his eye it, soon made his opponents feel his presence. His attempts to dribble, however, when hard pressed were abortive, and generally resulted in the ball being taken from him. To have passed the ball on the run to either wing would have been more effective, and considerably strengthened the combination. With more speed and judgment there are good hopes of Watson proving an efficient centre. Turner and Taylor on the right were far from good. Turner need not try to play

A FORWARD AND A HALF-BACK GAME

at one and the same time. It simply can't be done. His play suffered in consequence. Taylor was much too selfish, and had a tendency to run after the ball in place of waiting to receive a pass and back up his partner. Clark and Paterson on the left were overshadowed by their bigger opponents. Clark nevertheless contrived to outwit Ketchen occasionally. The Vics.' forwards, with the exception of Watson, are much too light, however, and it is a matter of misfortune that in height and weight they compare unfavourably with the Aberdeen. The play of the United commanded the sympathy and support of the majority of those present, and their reputation has not in the slightest been affected by their latest display.

Source: Aberdeen Journal, 13th November 1890

 
Played at Victoria Bridge Ground amid a heavy downpour of rain. With the wind slightly in their favour in the first 45, the ground men kept play almost constantly in the Aberdeen territory. The pressure was at times very severe, and on several occasions nothing but the worst of luck prevented the Vics from scoring. Watson had two narrow chances, the ball striking the post in the first attempt, and going behind in the second. Two-thirds of the period had elapsed when Aberdeen got away, and a nice dribble to the goal gave Ritchie a chance, which was taken, and the first point scored. From the kick off the Victoria United pressed, and Watson, rushing the leather up and getting past Ketchen, very cleverly sent in an equalising shot. The players thus crossed over level; but the Aberdeen, who had now the advantage of the wind, soon put themselves in the lead. Two goals fell to them in less than ten minutes, Key and Brown being the fortunate men. Darkness and the extremely sloppy condition of the ground militated against good work, and the returns therefore do not call for special comment. Some time before the whistle blew Key scored a fourth goal, and as the Vics were unable to improve their position, they retired defeated by 4 to 1.

Source: Northern Figaro, 15th November 1890

Victoria United Teamsheet: 

Bookings:

The Aberdeen Teamsheet: 

Bookings:

Referee:

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