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AFC - Match Report
match report 1892-93 fixture list
Aberdeenshire Cup Semi Final 
21/01/1893
 
Victoria United 3 - 2 The Aberdeen
Kick Off:  2:45 PM   Stewart, Stewart, Stewart       Toman, Toman,  
Attendance: 0
Venue: Wellington Bridge Grounds, Aberdeen
After having been postponed on three different occasions, the tie between the Aberdeen and the Victoria United in the semi-final round of the Aberdeenshire Cup Competition was played off on the Wellington Grounds on Saturday afternoon. The repeated snowstorms had formerly prevented the match being played, and it was at one time feared that the snowfall of Friday night would again interfere with the Association's arrangements. The ground was coated with half-frozen snow to the depth of about an inch, and it was known that unless a cup-tie could be played the Aberdeen would decline to take part in any other game. It was left to the referee (Mr McLeod, Cowlairs) to decide the matter, and when he arrived he declared the ground quite playable. For some time before play commenced snow fell, not heavily, but there was every appearance of another storm. All along considerable interest has been manifested in the tie, and despite the frequent disappointments which the spectators experienced in the former weeks, there was a large and enthusiastic crowd around the ropes. When the ball was kicked off the following were the teams : Aberdeen: Ramsay; Ketchen, Wood; Ross, Cobban, Ewan; Whitehead, White, Toman, Brown, Singleton. Victoria United: Gray; Thomson, Ririe; Hickie, Stewart, Ross; Turner, Benzie, Sutherland, Annand, Ferries. The linesmen were Messrs Blann, and Davidson.

Punctually at a quarter to three o'clock the Vics entered the field, and were greeted with a round of applause, and a few minutes afterwards the Chanonry men appeared, and received as warm a welcome from their supporters. The toss was won by the Victoria, and Toman kicked off. From midfield Singleton had a fine run, but was speedily checked, and the Vics made up the field. Wood by a strong kick aided his team, and in a second the Whites were swarming round the home citadel. A foul was got off Ross, and a dangerous kick was capitally fisted out by Gray. This did not however, entirely relieve the pressure, for again the Aberdeen attacked, but their efforts proved futile, the ball going over the crossbar. A few judicious passes on the right wing enabled the Victoria to recross the line, and the leather having been passed over to Ferries, that player made a determined effort to score. His kick was rather soft, and the opposing backs found little difficulty in dealing with it. Unfortunately for the United, one of their players fouled the sphere at this stage, and aided by this advantage, Aberdeen lost no time in transferring hostilities to the other end of the field. A "behind" was, however, the only result, and the ground team retaliated, and had hard lines in front of the goal - Ramsay, with the greatest alacrity, clearing his lines. Subsequently a foul kick was awarded Aberdeen within shooting distance of the Vic's goal, the cause being questionable tactics by Thomson. The ball was sharply negotiated by the defenders, who, in course of time, had a corner placed to their credit. It was fruitless, and a brilliant piece of play followed, Toman eventually, amid a perfect storm of applause, sending the leather spinning past the United custodian. This was the first point in the match, and the excitement of the spectators was now most intense. A look in by the Vics was followed by another attack on the part or the Chanonry men, but on this occasion a behind alone resulted, Whitehead's kick causing the ball to rebound off one of the uprights. A second or two afterwards Cobban had equally hard lines. It was now the turn of the United to try their skill in front of their opponents' goal. Time and again the invaders rushed at the Aberdeen charge and as often were they repelled. Ramsay played splendidly, and but for his smartness the scores would certainly have been equalised. A foul a few yards in front of the goalmouth looked as if it would prove fatal to the Aberdeen, but they came out of the scrimmage successfully, and followed up their good luck by carrying the leather up the field. Two fouls were awarded to them in succession in dangerous proximity to the Vics' citadel, but on each occasion the Blues managed to avert disaster. But the invaders were not to be put off, and after harassing the defenders as much as they possibly could they secured a corner. The United, however, were ready to receive the ball as soon as it was centred, and taking it in charge they made down the field. Some capital pieces of play were here witnessed, but scoring did not seem to be the luck of the Blues much to the chagrin of their supporters. They had some brilliant runs, but a slackness in the neighbourhood of the goal made their other efforts useless. From a throw in by the Aberdeen in the Vics' ground Turner got on the ball and partnered by Benzie, he wrought his way down the field. By an unexpected turn in the play the Vics were placed at an advantage, and by dint of some careful but prompt kicking Stewart overcame Ramsay, and scored the first goal for his team. This equalising of the totals was received with tremendous cheering. Before long the Vics again assumed the aggressive, and almost ere the spectators could realise it, Stewart had added a second point. But the scores were not to remain unequal, as by the next run the Aberdeen got up the field with little or no opposition, and Toman as easily sent the ball home. At half-time the scores stood: Aberdeen, 2 goals; Victoria United, 2.

Sutherland reset the ball in motion after a short interval. The first part of the play was a short run by the Vics and the sending of the leather behind. A similar act was gone through by Aberdeen, and, the opening scene over, the teams set themselves to the game in dead earnest. In mid-field a foul kick fell to the Blues, and from it the leather was taken to the mouth of the Chanonry goal. But Ramsay was on the alert, and cleverly fisted the ball clear of his lines. A second attack resulted in a behind. The Whites then piloted the sphere down the field, but one of the Aberdeen somehow or other managed to "sky" the leather, and sent it in the direction of the Dee. By a series of throws in the Blues wrought their way up to mid-field, and thence still further up the arena, and then with a final effort a charge was made upon the Aberdeen goal. It was fruitless. Before the game was very much older, however, the United got a corner, and a scrummage raised the excitement of the spectators to fever pitch. A goal was not however to be gained at this stage, but in about five minutes the Vics, by a combined effort once more drove their opponents back, and Stewart with a high shot added the winning point to the score of his team. Wood subsequently had a free kick about midfield, but his colleagues, although following up the leather so far, were outplayed, and the Victoria were not long in turning the tables upon their opponents. When within shooting distance of Ramsay's charge Turner tried hard to find a passage between the uprights, but as fate would have it the ball struck the posts and rebounded into play, and then behind. The play for the next ten minutes was somewhat uninteresting. Nevertheless both teams wrought hard and at length a corner was secured by Aberdeen. Nothing resulted. The Whites were fortunate in being awarded another corner in a few minutes, but after a stubborn contest the Blues dispersed the invaders, and made for the, north end of the field. Some good pressing on the part of both teams followed, but no scoring, and the match ended in a win for the United, the scores being: Victoria United, 3 goals ; Aberdeen, 2 goals. The Victoria United will have to meet the Orion in the final round for the trophy.

Source: Aberdeen Journal, 23rd January 1893

 

"Johannes G." Acts Mean.

Last Friday evening [13th January]match secretaries, players, and the huge army of football devotees - at least those who are good boys and keep timeous hours - retired to rest at peace with themselves and all the world, under the impression that at last Johannes Gelidus (no offence to " Jup. Pluv.") had taken a favourable turn of mind. Vain delusion! Peering from "blanket bay" on Saturday morning they found to their dire confusion that Johannes had again played them false, and was merrily sowing his seeds of kindness/which he continued to scatter at intervals during the forenoon. But just as it were to give himself the pleasure of being trampled upon, he desisted for a time, only, however, to fool the unwary ones to the top of their bent, as when they were at the height of their revels down he came like the wettest of wet blankets, laughing in his sleeve while he "flung the fleecy flakes" into their eyes, and made them wink the other optic. Oh, it was great fun, and J G. enjoyed himself thoroughly. The boys in white were not gulled by his wiles however, and would have none of it, even though they turned up stripped and ready for the fray at the home of the Wellingtonians.

SHORT KICKS.

From the Wellington Grounds.

There was some high old fun at the grounds of the Cupholders on Saturday afternoon.
The Vics, were the first to arrive, proceeding to the rendezvous in true democratic style - on shank's mare - and were going through their preliminaries when the whites arrived in regal order, having cabbed it from Jamie Smith's (the Waverley), where they had equipped themselves. The vehicular accommodation appeared to be rather cramped, however, for a pair of "trunks" were observed dangling from one of the cab windows on the way to the scene of action. Oh, Colin!
An attempt had been made to clear the ground, but still it was quite unplayable, and this, taken together with the absence of the referee - good judge - rendered a Cup tie impossible.
The Vics, were anxious for a friendly, but Captain Tom's commission was, "Cup tie or nothing," so after waiting till almost three o'clock in the hope of Mr. McLeod turning up, the Chanonry men retreated to the friendly shelter of their cabs, and proceeded back from whence they came, where a jolly little smoke was indulged in to the accompaniments of good old Mac, who made the rosewood hum to some tune - and very nice hamming too.
We felt for Captain Tom, who was left in the lurch, and had to toddle up to Jamie's all forlorn.
Only ticket-holders were admitted to the ground, and some of those made themselves ridiculous by throwing vulgarisms at the Aberdonians as they left.
The Vics, consoled themselves by indulging in a mixed game, which was thoroughly enjoyed. The tie will be played to-day (Saturday). Kick-off 2:45.

Source: Bon-Accord, 21st January 1893

 

SHORT KICKS.

From the Wellington Grounds.

At last the Cup tie between the Vics, and Aberdeen has been disposed of, and the Cupholders were successful.
The ground, to our mind, was not exactly up to what it should be in such an important match, but Referee McLeod (of Cowlairs fame) ruled it playable.
It is said that "Hope deferred maketh the heart sick," but this adage did not hold good on Saturday, for a more determined and energetic game it has not been our lot to witness.
To criticise the battle in detail space will not allow, but a few remarks thereanent before "taking the players over the coals" may be interesting.
All over the whites had as much of the play as the Vics, but their shooting was terribly lame, many golden opportunities being thrown away.
The exhibition on the whole was very fair as far as the defensive play of the teams went, but the forwards, bar Toman and White, were extremely poor, and if the Vics, quintette do not improve greatly ere the final comes off, the Orion should be able to give them a stiff tussle for victory.
As is invariably the case in representative matches, we expected to witness an energetic game, but we were not prepared to see tactics of such a highly condemnatory character as those indulged in by some of the blues, and those gentlemen may consider themselves lucky in escaping the extreme penalty.
Such conduct may be allowed to pass once or twice, but it has its own reward in the long run, and we would appeal to the transgressors to "stop and think' ere they bring disgrace upon themselves and the club.
Some of the Aberdeen retaliated, with the consequence that knocks hard and bloody were freely thrown about, Mr. McLeod having all his work cut out to keep anything like order.
Now for the players.
To classify the goalkeepers in the same street is only right, as Ramsay and Gray - although the former got more work than the latter - saved brilliantly, and kept the spectators "on tenterhooks" of excitement as they cleared from amongst a host of their respective opponents, whose attentions were of a very undesirable nature.
Ririe was head and shoulders above Thomson, whose exhibition was too robust, to say the least.
Stewart was king of the half-backs, and scored the three goals for his side. True, he had only to shout for the ball and it was passed to him, but still his generalship was rather clever - and it came off.
Hickie galloped about recklessly, and had, apparently, a fondness for kicking the leather over the enclosure, while Ross occasionally got in some very serviceable punts, but his tackling was below par - very much so.
None of the forwards did anything of note, and were not worth a goal, combination being at a discount.
Ketchen and Wood were better as a pair than their opponents, tackling, kicking, and blocking in capital style.
Colin Ross played splendidly, and Cobban in the centre was easily responsible for Sutherland, whom he completely overshadowed.
Ewan worked away in his usual quiet way, but has a lack of dash about him which greatly militates against his display.
Toman and White were decidedly the best forwards on either side, dribbling and dodging their opponents in a truly legitimate fashion.
Morley worked very hard, but fed Singleton far too much, and might with advantage have crossed the sphere to the right oftener.
Frank Whitehead was not at home on the extreme right. He got any amount of the ball, but could not utilise the opportunities given him to any appreciable purpose.
A comic incident took place at the commencement of the game, when Thomson drove the ball outside the enclosure and landed it on the telegraph wires above the railway viaduct, where it remained for some little time, being no doubt disgusted with the usage which it had been subjected to.
By the by, the fact that a late official of the whites was perched on said viaduct, which is used by the railway officials as a grand stand?free, gratis, and for nothing?had possibly something to do with the leather assuming an "air of supremacy." Yes, by J. A. B.-ers it did!

Source: Bon-Accord, 23rd January 1893

Victoria United Teamsheet: 

Unused Subs: Gray; Thomson, Ririe; Hickie, Stewart, Ross; Turner, Benzie, Sutherland, Annand, Ferries

Bookings:

The Aberdeen Teamsheet:  Ramsay; Ketchen, Wood; Ross, Cobban, Ewan; Whitehead, White, Toman, Brown, Singleton

Unused Subs: Gray; Thomson, Ririe; Hickie, Stewart, Ross; Turner, Benzie, Sutherland, Annand, Ferries

Bookings:

Referee: Mr McLeod, Cowlairs

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